What did Sparta and Athens disagree on?

What was the main issue between Sparta and Athens?

The origins of such a conflict are complex. The primary causes were that Sparta feared the growing power and influence of the Athenian Empire. The Peloponnesian war began after the Persian Wars ended in 449 BCE. The two powers struggled to agree on their respective spheres of influence, absent Persia’s influence.

What were the differences between Athens and Sparta?

The main difference between Athens and Sparta is that Athens was a form of democracy, whereas Sparta was a form of oligarchy. Athens and Sparta are two prominent Greek rival city-states. … Moreover, Athens’ economy was mainly based on trade, whereas Sparta’s economy was based on agriculture and conquering.

Why were Athens and Sparta rivals?

The reasons for this war are sometimes traced back as far as the democratic reforms of Cleisthenes, which Sparta always opposed. However, the more immediate reason for the war was Athenian control of the Delian League, the vast naval alliance that allowed it to dominate the Mediterranean Sea.

IT\'S FUNNING:  You asked: What is in port Heraklion Crete?

Who won Sparta or Athens?

Athens was forced to surrender, and Sparta won the Peloponnesian War in 404 BC. Spartans terms were lenient. First, the democracy was replaced by on oligarchy of thirty Athenians, friendly to Sparta. The Delian League was shut down, and Athens was reduced to a limit of ten triremes.

How was Sparta different from other city-states?

Unlike such Greek city-states as Athens, a center for the arts, learning and philosophy, Sparta was centered on a warrior culture. Male Spartan citizens were allowed only one occupation: soldier. Indoctrination into this lifestyle began early.

How was Athens different from Sparta quizlet?

Athens’ government is a democracy, which means citizens have the power. Sparta’s government was an Obligarchy, which means it was in the hands of a few. Athenians liked to trade. They used coins (which made trading easy).

Was there slavery in Sparta?

Sparta had the highest number of slaves compared to the number of owners. Some scholars estimate that there were seven times as many slaves as citizens. Q: What did slaves do in Sparta? Slaves in Sparta worked on their lands and produced agricultural products for their masters.

Was Athens and Sparta a rival?

The cities of Athens and Sparta were bitter rivals in ancient Greece. Geographically they are very close to each other, but have sometimes had very different values, lifestyles, and cultures.

Was Sparta and Athens conflict inevitable?

The Peloponnesian war was inevitable because Athens was too hungry for power, and tried to take total control of Greece. … When Athens ended its alliance with Corcyra in 433 B.C. and began to surround Potidaea, it threatened Corinth’s position. Sparta feared that Athens was becoming too powerful and tried to avert war.

IT\'S FUNNING:  Is Athens domestic and international airport the same?

Who was the main rival of Athens?

The climactic event of the classical Greek world was the great war between Athens and Sparta (the so-called ‘Peloponnesian War’) that dominated the final third of the 5th century BC.

Did Sparta ever lose a war?

The decisive defeat of the Spartan hoplite army by the armed forces of Thebes at the battle of Leuctra in 371 B.C. ended an epoch in Greek military history and permanently altered the Greek balance of power.

Did Spartans ever surrender?

It is often said that the Spartan warriors never retreated and never surrendered. At the battle of Sphacteria, the Spartans not only lost to a force of mostly light infantry, but they were forced into a shameful surrender that changed the dynamics of the war. …

Did the Athenians beat the Spartans?

In the battle, the Athenians obliterated the Spartan fleet, and succeeded in re-establishing the financial basis of the Athenian Empire. Between 410 and 406, Athens won a continuous string of victories, and eventually recovered large portions of its empire. All of this was due, in no small part, to Alcibiades.