What groups were not allowed to be citizens in Athens?

The percentage of the population that actually participated in the government was 10% to 20% of the total number of inhabitants, but this varied from the fifth to the fourth century BC. This excluded a majority of the population: slaves, freed slaves, children, women and metics (foreign residents in Athens).

Who was not allowed to be a citizen in Athens?

To be classed as a citizen in fifth-century Athens you had to be male, born from two Athenian parents, over eighteen years old, and complete your military service. Women, slaves, metics and children under the age of 20 were not allowed to become citizens.

Who were not allowed to be citizens in ancient Greece?

Who was considered a citizen in Ancient Greece? Men over the age of 18 with Athenian parents who owned land. Women, children, slaves, and metics (foreigners) were not considered citizens.

What group was allowed citizenship in Athens?

Not everyone in Athens was considered a citizen. Only free, adult men enjoyed the rights and responsibility of citizenship. Only about 20 percent of the population of Athens were citizens. Women were not citizens and therefore could not vote or have any say in the political process.

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Which groups were excluded and not allowed to participate in Athenian democracy?

The percentage of the population that actually participated in the government was 10% to 20% of the total number of inhabitants, but this varied from the fifth to the fourth century BC. This excluded a majority of the population: slaves, freed slaves, children, women and metics (foreign residents in Athens).

Who were citizens in Athens?

The Athenian definition of “citizens” was also different from modern-day citizens: only free men were considered citizens in Athens. Women, children, and slaves were not considered citizens and therefore could not vote. Each year 500 names were chosen from all the citizens of ancient Athens.

How were non citizens treated in Athens?

While having no citizen rights, of which Athenians were very jealous, they did have access to the courts; but they were unable to own property, so were always lodgers, had to serve in the military, pay a metic tax and, if they became wealthy, were liable for taxes on the rich.

Who were citizens of ancient Athens quizlet?

Who was considered a citizen in Ancient Greece? Men over the age of 18 with Athenian parents who owned land. Women, children, slaves, and metics (foreigners) were not considered citizens.

How many citizens were there in ancient Athens?

In Athens and Attica, there were at least 150,000 Athenians, around 50,000 aliens, and more than 100,000 slaves. Approximately 8,000 Spartiates (adult male citizens) ruled over a population of 100,000 enslaved and semi-enslaved people.

Who did Sparta and Athens team together to fight?

The Peloponnesian War (431–404 BC) was an ancient Greek war fought between the Delian League, which was led by Athens, and the Peloponnesian League, which was led by Sparta. Historians have traditionally divided the war into three phases.

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Who were Spartan citizens?

Spartan Culture and Government

Its inhabitants were classified as Spartiates (Spartan citizens who enjoyed full rights), Mothakes (non-Spartan, free men raised as Spartans), Perioikoi (freed men), and Helots (state-owned serfs, part of the enslaved, non-Spartan, local population).

Why was Athens not a full democracy?

Athens was not a full democracy because most people were not considered citizens and, therefore, could not vote.

What was a limitation placed on Athenian democracy?

Athenian democracy was limited because only a certain group of people could make decisions. In order to be part of the legislature, you had to be a male landholding citizen. Despite this, Athens is still admired as an early model of democracy because they were the creators of it. Most empires used a monarchy to rule.

Who was allowed in Agora?

Origins. Early in Greek history (10th–4th centuries BC), free-born citizens would gather in the agora for military duty or to hear statements of the ruling king or council. Later, the agora also served as a marketplace, where merchants kept stalls or shops to sell their goods amid colonnades.