How did the Persian wars lead to the golden age for the Greek city states?

How did the Persian war lead to the Golden Age of Greece?

The age began with the unlikely defeat of a vast Persian army by badly outnumbered Greeks and it ended with an inglorious and lengthy war between Athens and Sparta. … Military victory over the Persians, largely achieved under Athenian leadership, set the stage.

How did the Persian wars affect the Greek city-states?

The Persian Wars affected the Greek city-states because they came under the leadership of Athens and were to never again invade the Persian Armies. How did the Peloponnesian Wars affect the Greek city-states? The Peloponnesian wars affected them when it led to the decline of Athenian power and continued rivalry.

How did the Persian war Impact ancient Greece?

After initial Persian victories, the Persians were eventually defeated, both at sea and on land. The wars with the Persians had a great effect on ancient Greeks. The Athenian Acropolis was destroyed by the Persians, but the Athenian response was to build the beautiful buildings whose ruins we can still see today.

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What happened to the Greek city-states after the Persian war?

Following the Persian withdrawal from Europe and the Greek victory at Mycale, Macedon and the city-states of Ionia regained their independence.

What factors led to the Golden Age?

The outcome of a civilization’s growth depended very much on government policies. Impact of good policies can lead to political, economical and social stability, which are the ideal conditions of achieving golden age.

How did the Persian war lead to the Peloponnesian War?

The primary causes were that Sparta feared the growing power and influence of the Athenian Empire. The Peloponnesian war began after the Persian Wars ended in 449 BCE. … This disagreement led to friction and eventually outright war. Additionally, Athens and its ambitions caused increasing instability in Greece.

How did the Persian and Peloponnesian wars affect the Greek city-states?

The two most powerful city-states in ancient Greece, Athens and Sparta, went to war with each other from 431 to 405 B.C. The Peloponnesian War marked a significant power shift in ancient Greece, favoring Sparta, and also ushered in a period of regional decline that signaled the end of what is considered the Golden Age …

What was the result of the Persian war?

The result was that Athens won the Persian wars and that they stopped Persia from conquering Europe. Who were the kings of Persia that we studied? The first king was King Darius of the Persian Empire. Then, when he died his son Xerxes took power and became King Xerxes.

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How did the Persian wars and their aftermath affect the politics and culture of ancient Greece?

How did the Persian Wars and their aftermath affect the politics and culture of ancient Greece? Greek and Persian cultures clashed in the Persian Wars. Athens and Sparta led resistance to Persian invasions, and final victory left Athens a naval and imperial power. … By contrast, Spartan women enjoyed some prestige.

Why were the Persian Wars important to Greece?

The Persian Wars gave the Greeks a new feeling of confidence. The Ionian Greek cities, once subject states to the Persian king, gained their independence. The Greek world would go on to achieve great things, led by the city-state of Athens.

How did the Persian War affect the balance of power among the Greek city-states?

How did the Persian War affect the balance of power among the Greek city-states? Athens dominated over other city-states. perfect balance and universal harmony and order.

What did the Persian and Peloponnesian wars indicate about the relationship between Sparta and Athens?

What did the Persian and Peloponnesian wars indicate about the relationship between Sparta and Athens? … They were not very successful in war. They sometimes fought with and sometimes against each other. They usually fought each other and had a long, bitter relationship.