Quick Answer: How did Athens come to dominate Greece after the Persian Wars?

Following the wars, Athens emerged as the supreme naval power in Greece. It formed the Delian League, ostensibly to create a cohesive Greek network among city-states to ward off further Persian attacks.

Why did Athens dominate Greece after the Persian Wars?

How did Athens become a powerful empire after the Persian Wars? After the Persian War was over, and Sparta and Athens had defeated Persia, they emerged as heroes and powerful city-states. … Every city-state donated money and supplies to the league, and as the league’s leader, Athens took the money for themselves.

How did Athens become a powerful empire after the Persian Wars?

How did Athens become a powerful empire after the Persian Wars? After the Persian War was over, and Sparta and Athens had defeated Persia, they emerged as heroes and powerful city-states. … Every city-state donated money and supplies to the league, and as the league’s leader, Athens took the money for themselves.

What did Athens do after the Persian War?

Following the two Persian invasions of Greece, and during the Greek counterattacks that commenced after the Battles of Plataea and Mycale, Athens enrolled all island and some mainland city-states into an alliance, called the Delian League, the purpose of which was to pursue conflict with the Persian Empire, prepare for …

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How did the Athenians defeat the Persian?

According to Herodotus’ account, the flanks of the Athenian army defeated the Persians, and then engulfed the Persians in the center. The Athenians won the battle, killing an estimated 6,400 Persians while losing only 192 men (these numbers were likely exaggerated by Herodotus).

What happened to Greece after the Persian War?

After the second Persian invasion of Greece was halted, Sparta withdrew from the Delian League and reformed the Peloponnesian League with its original allies. Many Greek city-states had been alienated from Sparta following the violent actions of Spartan leader Pausanias during the siege of Byzantium.

What was the impact of the Persian Wars on Greece?

After initial Persian victories, the Persians were eventually defeated, both at sea and on land. The wars with the Persians had a great effect on ancient Greeks. The Athenian Acropolis was destroyed by the Persians, but the Athenian response was to build the beautiful buildings whose ruins we can still see today.

How did Athens impact Greece?

Athens was the largest and most influential of the Greek city-states. It had many fine buildings and was named after Athena, the goddess of wisdom and warfare. The Athenians invented democracy, a new type of government where every citizen could vote on important issues, such as whether or not to declare war.

What did the Athenians create after the Greek wars?

The Delian League, founded in 478 BC, was an association of Greek city-states, with the number of members numbering between 150 and 330 under the leadership of Athens, whose purpose was to continue fighting the Persian Empire after the Greek victory in the Battle of Plataea at the end of the Second Persian invasion of …

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How did Athens become wealthy after the Battle of Marathon?

Athens became so powerful from its alliance with city states on the island Dellos. All members protected one another and paid money for weapons and such but then Athan started to run the alliance as if it was it’s own empire not letting anyone leave. Athens made everyone pay money to them so they soon became rich.

What happened to Athens Greece?

Due to its poor handling of the war, the democracy in Athens was briefly overthrown by a coup in 411 BC; however, it was quickly restored. The Peloponnesian War ended in 404 BC with the complete defeat of Athens.

Who had defeat Athens?

The Achaemenid destruction of Athens was accomplished by the Achaemenid Army of Xerxes I during the Second Persian invasion of Greece, and occurred in two phases over a period of two years, in 480–479 BCE.